Tag Archives: Prevention

The importance of a smart vaccination in the control of Eimeria

The importance of information and data quality in any production process is no longer a matter for debate. Poultry production is no exception to this and we are increasingly seeing how the use of technology and relevant information is on the rise. The vaccination process and, more specifically, the control of Eimeria should form part of this new information model.In the 2016 ‘Power of Meat’ survey, one of the emerging trends was consumers’ increasing awareness regarding traceability and transparency in the production process of the meat they consume.
 

There is a general consensus that consumers in the future will be more sensitive towards where their meat comes from and treatments given to animals used for meat production. For example, the same survey from 2017 stated that “antibiotic-free” was the most highly valued specific characteristic for poultry meat consumers ahead of others such as “organic” or “natural”.

HIPRA is completely aligned with these trends with its Origins programme  for rearing antibiotic-free animals and, more specifically, with vaccinations against Eimeria so as to achieve antibiotic-free rearing in poultry production.
As mentioned above, another important trend must be considered: the use of information and technology in any production process. Again, there is an overwhelming consensus that this trend is not going to slow down and that the adoption of new technologies is a key factor in terms of efficiency and productivity. Therefore, with a growing population and the resultant increased demand for protein in the coming years, concepts like efficiency and productivity should not be dismissed.
HIPRA is a strong advocator of the use of technology and believes that the vaccination process should be approached by taking into account all such trends. Our answer to vaccination in terms of traceability, transparency and efficiency is called Smart Vaccination.
With Smart Vaccination, HIPRA offers a new concept in its portfolio to ensure precision and efficacy during the vaccination process, whilst at the same time providing relevant information to make decision-making easier and to increase reliability.
Information such as the time of the vaccination, who administered it, which device was used and the specific details of all vaccine vials used are just one click away with HIPRAlink.
Furthermore, all this information can be easily shared with all stakeholders involved in the production process.

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Dealing with coccidiosis by reducing the use of antibiotics: is it sustainable? (Part 2)

It is our responsibility to search for and choose the right tools to deal with coccidiosis in poultry with current consumer preferences tending towards the purchase of products from livestock grown using sustainable methods.

Because of worldwide concern about drug resistance associated with the immoderate use of antibiotics in poultry production, there has been a major effort to find alternative treatment and methods of prevention.

There is a greater demand for products from sustainable livestock and the higher prices may encourage the farmer. All these factors are in addition to the strongly held beliefs of many consumers that broilers reared with less antibiotic use not only provide additional health benefits to them and their families, but also that sustainable farming practices provide long-term environmental benefits.

It is well known that the major use of antibiotics in poultry farming is linked to coccidiosis prevention and treatment. Therefore, this is the starting point for thinking about reducing their use.

First of all, a biosecurity program needs to be implemented and well managed. It is an everyday goal. The program should address points such as controlling access by individuals, cleaning and disinfection, feed and water quality, access by other animals.

The second step is to study the available alternatives for dealing with coccidiosis. Researchers like Niewold in 2007 have suggested that the unique and highly reproducible effects of in-feed antibiotics may be due to the prevention of immunological stress or their anti-inflammatory effect rather than their antimicrobial role, and this should be considered when searching for new compounds to be used as replacements.

Since we know that prevention it is a key point in sustainable animal farming, vaccination is an important tool to be considered.

Over the past 10 years, experiences in the field have provided data regarding this cost/benefit ratio, derived from the use of rotation programs with precocious attenuated vaccines, such as HIPRACOX®.

Rotation programs allow the poultry farmer to decide on the use of fewer preventive antibiotics – anticoccidials – and to decrease coccidiosis lesions, which means less use of antibiotics as treatment.

This is a long term plan, in which every decision must be taken in a responsible way. Using the right tools, success can be achieved in the matter of coccidiosis with the use of sustainable methods.
References:

Niewold T.A. 2007. The nonantibiotic anti-inflammatory effect of antimicrobial growth promoters, the real mode of action? A hypothesis. Poultry Science, vol. 86 (4), 605-609.

Chasing the cause of chicken coccidiosis

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Blog

15 July 2014
By Adam Reid

Credit: Thegreenj, Wikipedia Commons Credit: Thegreenj, Wikipedia Commons Sequencing the genome of the chicken parasite Eimeria has uncovered a fascinating quirk and could help us to develop more cost-effective vaccines that will target all seven species of the parasite. Coccidiosis, the disease caused by Eimeria parasites, poses a major threat to food security as chickens are one of the most important sources of animal protein worldwide.

When we looked at the DNA of this parasite, we noticed that each chromosome had an ordered, barcode-like pattern of repetitive sections of DNA code. These repeats often occur within genes and it turns out that this parasite has the most repeat-rich genes ever described.

While these repeat-rich regions disrupt the majority of protein-coding sequences in the genome, we have every reason to believe they are beneficial to the parasite, as they have been present in the genome for millions of years…

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PRRS

PRRS is the number 1 problem in swine production. But it can be controled. Using management, biosecurity and good vaccines.

The choice of the right vaccine, with the rigth strain and a correct vaccination programme is key for the succes in the prevention of the disease. Diagnostic tools are very important for taking decisions in a proper way, and always with the collaboration of the vet in charge of the farm.

Unistrain PRRS